Mental health stigma

Mental health stigma

World mental health day

Gone are the days , some countries set up people or agency to sweep the nations of the mentally retarded people in the society. Mentally retarded people need help to recover. Some may not recover but the most we  know becomes better in their situation.

Those who recovers are likely to go back to their mental problems or stay healthy depending on the way other people treat them. There came the need for the world to preach against social stigma.

Leaders of the past sort the need to remember the mentally retarded victims by reserving a special day to to educate the world on the need to be aware and advocate against social stigma. This special day is known as the World Mental Health Day

World Mental Health Day is an international day for global mental health education, awareness and advocacy against social stigma. It was first celebrated in 1992 at the initiative of the World Federation for Mental Health, a global mental health organization with members and contacts in more than

why mental health is important

Mental illnesses are conditions that affect a person’s thinking, feeling, mood or behavior, such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, or schizophrenia. Conditions as such may be occasional or long-lasting (chronic) and affect someone’s ability to relate to others and function normally each day.

For one to be happy there is the need for:

1. Depression free Life

2. Stress free

3. Bipolar free life

4. Free from Anxiety

Mental and physical health are equally important components of overall health.  Mental illness, especially depression, increases the risk for many types of physical health problems, particularly long-lasting conditions like stroke, type 2 diabetes, and heart disease. Similarly, the presence of chronic conditions can increase the risk for mental illness.

Causes of mental illness

Mental illness can arise from several factors as there is no single cause for mental illness. A number of factors can contribute to risk for mental illness, such as

  • Your genes and family history
  • Your life experiences, such as stress or a history of abuse, especially if they happen in childhood
  • Biological factors such as chemical imbalances in the brain
  • A traumatic brain injury
  • A mother’s exposure to viruses or toxic chemicals while pregnant
  • Use of alcohol or recreational drugs
  • Having a serious medical condition like cancer
  • Having few friends, and feeling lonely or isolated

Mental disorders are not caused by character flaws. They have nothing to do with being lazy or weak.

Mental health stigma

There are instances patients recover from mental disorder or illness but finds it difficult fitting in society as a result of people seeing them as inferiors which stigma.

In short Stigma is when someone sees you in a negative way because of your mental illness. Discrimination is when someone treats you in a negative way because of your mental illness. Social stigma and discrimination can make mental health problems worse and stop a person from getting the help they need..

When someone treats you in a negative way because of your mental illness, this is discrimination.

The harmful effects of stigma

Some of the effects of stigma include:

  • feelings of shame, hopelessness and isolation
  • reluctance to ask for help or to get treatment
  • lack of understanding by family, friends or others
  • fewer opportunities for employment or social interaction
  • bullying, physical violence or harassment
  • self-doubt – the belief that you will never overcome your illness or be able to achieve what you want in life.

How stress affect mental health

When stress becomes overwhelming and prolonged, the risks for mental health problems and medical problems increase. Long-term stress increases the risk of mental health problems such as anxiety and depression, substance use problems, sleep problems, pain and bodily complaints such as muscle tension.

Signs & Symptoms of stress

The signs and symptoms of stress may be cognitive (thinking-related), emotional, physical or behavioral. Their severity can range from mild to severe

  • difficulty concentrating or thinking
  • memory problems
  • negativity or lack of self-confidence
  • constant worrying
  • difficulty making decisions.
  • moodiness
  • low morale
  • irritability
  • feeling hopeless or helpless
  • feeling apprehensive, anxious or nervous

How to recover from mental illness

1. Value yourself:

Treat yourself with kindness and respect, and avoid self-criticism. Make time for your hobbies and favorite projects, or broaden your horizons. Do a daily crossword puzzle, plant a garden, take dance lessons, learn to play an instrument or become fluent in another language.

2. Take care of your body:

Taking care of yourself physically can improve your mental health. Be sure to:

  • Eat nutritious meals
  • Avoid smoking and vaping– see Cessation Help
  • Drink plenty of water
  • Exercise, which helps decrease depression and anxiety and improve moods
  • Get enough sleep. Researchers believe that lack of sleep contributes to a high rate of depression in college students.
3. Surround yourself with good people

People with strong family or social connections are generally healthier than those who lack a support network. Make plans with supportive family members and friends, or seek out activities where you can meet new people, such as a club, class or support group.

4. Give yourself

Volunteer your time and energy to help someone else. You’ll feel good about doing something tangible to help someone in need — and it’s a great way to meet new people.

5. Learn how to deal with stress

Like it or not, stress is a part of life. Practice good coping skills: Try One-Minute Stress Strategies, exercising on regular base, take a nature walk, play with your pet or try journal writing as a stress reducer. Also, remember to smile and see the humor in life. Research shows that laughter can boost your immune system, ease pain, relax your body and reduce stress.

6. Quiet your mind:

Try meditating, Mindfulness and or prayer. Relaxation exercises and prayer can improve your state of mind and outlook on life. In fact, research shows that meditation may help you feel calm and enhance the effects of therapy.

7. Set realistic goals

Decide what you want to achieve academically, professionally and personally, and write down the steps you need to realize your goals. Aim high, but be realistic and don’t over-schedule. You’ll enjoy a tremendous sense of accomplishment and self-worth as you progress toward your goal.

8. Break up the monotony:

Although our routines make us more efficient and enhance our feelings of security and safety, a little change of pace can perk up a tedious schedule. Alter your jogging route, plan a road-trip, take a walk in a different park, hang some new pictures or try a new restaurant.

9. Avoid alcohol and other drugs

Keep alcohol use to a minimum and avoid other drugs. Sometimes people use alcohol and other drugs to “self-medicate” but in reality, alcohol and other drugs only aggravate problems. For more information, see Alcohol and Other Drugs.

10. Get help when you need it:

Seeking help is a sign of strength — not a weakness. And it is important to remember that treatment is effective. People who get appropriate care can recover from mental illness and addiction and lead full, rewarding lives.

One thought on “Mental health stigma

  1. It’s nearly impossible to find experienced people about this
    topic, however, you seem like you know what you’re talking about!
    Thanks

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